1. 06:41 18th Apr 2014

    Notes: 151

    Reblogged from buggirl

    buggirl:

Me and my rhino beetle buddy cruising around Mindo, Ecuador all day.

    buggirl:

    Me and my rhino beetle buddy cruising around Mindo, Ecuador all day.

     
  2. 07:12 13th Apr 2014

    Notes: 8

    Reblogged from reanimateobjects

    image: Download

     
  3. 15:01 5th Apr 2014

    Notes: 146

    Reblogged from rhamphotheca

    image: Download

    astronomy-to-zoology:

Genus: Macroxiphus
Macroxiphus is a genus of unusual katydids (Tettigoniidae) that are distributed throughout South East Asia and Micronesia. Members of Macroxiphus are unique in that their larvae are exceptional ant mimics, and use their mimicry to trick potential predators into thinking they are harmful ants. Macroxiphus spp. will lose this disguise as they move on into adulthood.
Classification
Animalia-Arthropoda-Insecta-Orthoptera-Ensifera-Tettigoniidea-Tettigonioidea-Tettigoniidae-Macroxiphus
Image: Muhammad Mahdi Karim

    astronomy-to-zoology:

    Genus: Macroxiphus

    Macroxiphus is a genus of unusual katydids (Tettigoniidae) that are distributed throughout South East Asia and Micronesia. Members of Macroxiphus are unique in that their larvae are exceptional ant mimics, and use their mimicry to trick potential predators into thinking they are harmful ants. Macroxiphus spp. will lose this disguise as they move on into adulthood.

    Classification

    Animalia-Arthropoda-Insecta-Orthoptera-Ensifera-Tettigoniidea-Tettigonioidea-Tettigoniidae-Macroxiphus

    Image: Muhammad Mahdi Karim

     
  4. 15:01 3rd Apr 2014

    Notes: 675

    Reblogged from rhamphotheca

    astronomy-to-zoology:

    Genus: Beaus

    Beaus is an unusual genus of small Platygastrid wasps that occur worldwide. Adult Beaus spp. are unbelievably small and are parasitize on egg sacs of spiders of the family Lycosidae. Female Beaus spp. are wingless and phoretic, ‘riding’ on the female spider until her eggs are laid. The female will then lay her eggs inside the spider’s egg, the female wasps’s larvae will then develop inside the eggs until they reach adulthood. 

    Classification

    Animalia-Arthropoda-Insecta-Hymenoptera-Platygastroidea-Platygastridae-Scelioninae-Baeus

    Images: ©tom murray and ©Ashley Bradford

     
  5. 04:50 2nd Apr 2014

    Notes: 489

    Reblogged from bbsrc

    Tags: Gribbleisopodwood worm

    bbsrc:

    The new IPCC Climate Change Report is just out. Could new sources of energy help combat climate change?

    Meet the Gribble

    This little critter could help power cars of the future by turning wood into liquid fuel. 

    http://www.bbsrc.ac.uk/news/industrial-biotechnology/2012/121128-f-meet-the-gribbles.aspx

    Image: Laura Michie with thanks to Dr Alex Ball for permission to use the confocal microscopy facilities at The Natural History Museum.

     
  6. 15:01 30th Mar 2014

    Notes: 526

    Reblogged from rhamphotheca

    image: Download

    clusterpod:

Rutenalid beetle, Anoplognathus porosus.
This genus is commonly referred to as Christmas Beetles, and the family come in a variety of shiny and metallic colours.
Larvae live underground, where they will also pupate, the adults all emerging at the same time. In Australia this is midsummer, explaining their common name, where they can be extremely common in some areas.
They feed on eucalyptus.
This individual photographed on the Lyrebird Walk, near the Mount Granya summit, Mount Granya State Park, Victoria.

    clusterpod:

    Rutenalid beetle, Anoplognathus porosus.

    This genus is commonly referred to as Christmas Beetles, and the family come in a variety of shiny and metallic colours.

    Larvae live underground, where they will also pupate, the adults all emerging at the same time. In Australia this is midsummer, explaining their common name, where they can be extremely common in some areas.

    They feed on eucalyptus.

    This individual photographed on the Lyrebird Walk, near the Mount Granya summit, Mount Granya State Park, Victoria.

     
  7. 15:01 29th Mar 2014

    Notes: 580

    Reblogged from rhamphotheca

    astronomy-to-zoology:

"Blind Velvet Worm" (Tasmanipatus anophthalmus)
…a species of velvet worm (Phylum: Onychophora) that is endemic to north-eastern Tasmania. True to its common name T. anophthalmus lacks eyes and is completely blind. Like other velvet worms the blind velvet worm is terrestrial and typically inhabits dry eucalyptus forests. Also like other velvet worms it is nocturnal and a predator, feeding on small invertebrates, which are caught via the ejection of sticky fluid from appendages on its head.
Currently Tasmanipatus anophthalmus is listed as Endangered, this is likely to to its small range.
Classification
Animalia-Onychophora-Onychophora-Onychophora-Peripatopsidae-Tasmanipatus-T. anophthalmus
Image: Robert Mesibov

    astronomy-to-zoology:

    "Blind Velvet Worm" (Tasmanipatus anophthalmus)

    …a species of velvet worm (Phylum: Onychophora) that is endemic to north-eastern Tasmania. True to its common name T. anophthalmus lacks eyes and is completely blind. Like other velvet worms the blind velvet worm is terrestrial and typically inhabits dry eucalyptus forests. Also like other velvet worms it is nocturnal and a predator, feeding on small invertebrates, which are caught via the ejection of sticky fluid from appendages on its head.

    Currently Tasmanipatus anophthalmus is listed as Endangered, this is likely to to its small range.

    Classification

    Animalia-Onychophora-Onychophora-Onychophora-Peripatopsidae-Tasmanipatus-T. anophthalmus

    Image: Robert Mesibov

     
  8. image: Download

    Vladimir Stankovic’s - Entomology Tab. IV

    Vladimir Stankovic’s - Entomology Tab. IV

    (Source: etsy.com)

     
  9. 16:01 9th Mar 2014

    Notes: 33

    Reblogged from pogosticks

    image: Download

    pogosticks:

Jewel Beetle Catoxantha opulenta by Bernard Dupont
     
  10. 15:01 28th Nov 2013

    Notes: 4195

    Reblogged from genderphobia

    image: Download

    (Source: nissastuff)

     
  11. 15:01 25th Nov 2013

    Notes: 191

    Reblogged from sinobug

    sinobug:

Aphrophorid Spittlebug (Philagra sp., Aphrophoridae)

The spittlebugs are best known for the nymphal stage (even though they are rarely actually seen), which produces a cover of frothed-up plant sap resembling spit; the nymphs are therefore commonly known as spittlebugs and their froth as cuckoo spit, frog spit or snake spit.

The froth serves a number of purposes. It hides the nymph from the view of predators and parasites, it insulates against heat and cold, thus providing thermal control and also moisture control. Without the froth the insect would quickly dry up. The nymphs pierce plants and suck sap causing very little damage, much of the filtered fluids go into the production of the froth, which has an acrid taste, deterring predators.


by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese true bugs and hoppers on my Flickr site HERE…..

    sinobug:

    Aphrophorid Spittlebug (Philagra sp., Aphrophoridae)

    The spittlebugs are best known for the nymphal stage (even though they are rarely actually seen), which produces a cover of frothed-up plant sap resembling spit; the nymphs are therefore commonly known as spittlebugs and their froth as cuckoo spit, frog spit or snake spit.

    The froth serves a number of purposes. It hides the nymph from the view of predators and parasites, it insulates against heat and cold, thus providing thermal control and also moisture control. Without the froth the insect would quickly dry up. The nymphs pierce plants and suck sap causing very little damage, much of the filtered fluids go into the production of the froth, which has an acrid taste, deterring predators.

    Aphrophorid Spittlebug (Philagra sp., Aphrophoridae)

    by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
    Pu’er, Yunnan, China

    See more Chinese true bugs and hoppers on my Flickr site HERE…..

     
  12. 19:23 4th Oct 2013

    Notes: 6755

    Reblogged from insectlove

     
  13. 15:01 24th Sep 2013

    Notes: 860

    Reblogged from insectlove

    insectlove:

    andshewassoshedidmet this magnificent little fellow at the park today. male white tiger moth

     
  14. 15:01 23rd Sep 2013

    Notes: 401

    Reblogged from rhamphotheca

    astronomy-to-zoology:

    Devil’s Coach-horse Beetle (Ocypus olens)

    Also known as the Cocktail Beetle, O. olens is a species of rove beetle that is widespread throughout Europe. However, it has also been introduced to the Americas and parts of Asia and Australia. Like other rove beetles O. olens is a predator and hunts at night for earthworms, woodlice, carrion, and other invertebrates. During the day O. olens will take shelter under stones and logs and is most active during April and October. When threatened O. olens will open its jaws and raise its abdomen, making it look similar to a scorpion. It can also emit foul smelling odor from glands at the end of its abdomen.

    Classification

    Animalia-Arthropoda-Insecta-Coleoptera-Staphylinidae-Ocypus-O.olens

    Images: BenPhil and Joy Russell

     
  15. 15:01 3rd Sep 2013

    Notes: 250

    Reblogged from rhamphotheca

    Tags: buginsectspittlebug

    image: Download

    rhamphotheca:

textless: Oh spittlebug, you’re so funny.

    rhamphotheca:

    textless: Oh spittlebug, you’re so funny.